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Compound Could Play a Novel Role in Halting Spread of Pancreatic Cancer

Compound Could Play a Novel Role in Halting Spread of Pancreatic Cancer
In early test tube and mouse studies, investigators at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have found that nonmuscle myosin IIC (MYH14), a protein activated in response to mechanical stress, helps promote metastatic behavior in pancreatic cancer cells, and that the compound 4-hydroxyacetophenone (4-HAP), known to stiffen myosin IIC-containing cells, can send it into overdrive, overwhelming the ability of cells to invade nearby tissue.

The work, described online in July in the journal Cancer Research, found that 4-HAP reduced metastatic tumor formation in a mouse model of human pancreatic cancer by assessing the fraction of liver surface covered by tumor tissue. Read more . . .


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