Molecular Switch Controlling Immune Suppression May Help Turn Up Immunotherapies

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Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have identified a strategy to maximize the effectiveness of anti-cancer immune therapy.

The researchers identified  a molecular switch that controls immune suppression, opening the possibility to further improving and refining emerging immunotherapies that boost the body’s own abilities to fight diseases ranging from cancer to Alzheimer’s and Crohn’s disease.

The findings are published in the September 19 online issue of Nature.

“Immunotherapies, such as T cell checkpoint inhibitors, are showing great promise in early treatments and trials, but they are not universally effective,” said Judith A. Varner, Ph.D., professor in the Departments of Pathology and Medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine. “We have identified a new method to boost the effectiveness of current immune therapy. Our findings also improve our understanding of key mechanisms that control cancer immune suppression and could lead to the development of more effective immunotherapies.” Read more . . .


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